Oil Well Pump

Definition - What does Oil Well Pump mean?

An Oil Well Pump is a pump used in a well to pump or lift the crude oil from the well. Some wells do not have enough pressure to lift the crude oil and bring it to the surface on their own, hence the need for an Oil Well Pump. This pump increases the pressure within the oil reservoir and pushes the oil to reach the surface. Most wells require the pump as with time their efficiency to lift oil to the surface depletes.

Petropedia explains Oil Well Pump

An Oil Well Pump is basically used to mechanically lift oil from an oil well when it cannot be lifted naturally. There are various methods of pumping that use the pump.

Beam pumping is a common type of oil well pumping system, whereby the pump is kept below and on the surface to increase the pressure to pull the oil. Sucker rods are joined to the pump that is plunged down in the wellbore. A sucker rod pump is attached to these rods close to the bottom of the well. This rod pump pulls the oil from the resource found beneath the well to the surface.

Another method is the hydraulic pumping system. This system is fitted with hydraulic downhole pump instead of sucker rods that brings oil to surface. The hydraulic pumps are made up of two pistons joined together by a rod. Subsurface and surface hydraulic pumps work together to bring the oil to the surface from the well. The surface pump sends the oil through a tubing string to the subsurface pump at the bottom of tubing string. The oil is then sent to the surface through the second tubing string.

The electric submersible pump system installs a centrifugal pump below the reservoir fluid level. The pump is connected to a long electric motor. With its several blades or impellers the pump moves the oil within the well. An artificial lift is applied by the moving the blades on a pump shaft that creates pressure on the surrounding oil and thus forcing it to the surface.

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